A few weeks ago, we posted a blog about women’s health concerns and prevention, and this week, it is the men’s turn.

On average men die five years sooner than women, and the reasons are more complex than you might think. One of the major reasons is that men are frequently less open about their health and medical concerns than women, and as a result, some health problems may go unnoticed until it is too late.

In fact, according to the Canadian Men’s Health Foundation, up to 70% of the health problems that men suffer from are preventable.

So what can men do to prevent and/or mitigate some of their most common health problems? Here are a few tips:

1. Attend regular check-ups

Through regular doctor’s visits, you can stay aware of any early warning signs for conditions like stroke or heart disease. Conditions like high blood pressure or cholesterol may require medication but they can often be corrected through lifestyle changes when caught early enough.

2. Ask about cancer screenings

The three most common types of cancer for Canadian men are prostate, colorectal, and lung – and all of these can be treated and have a much better outcome when they are detected early. Make sure your doctor is aware of any family history and lifestyle habits that associate with these diseases and start asking about when your screenings for these should begin.

3. Get screened for diabetes

Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death for Canadian men as it can contribute to a number of other health problems including heart disease and kidney failure. Fortunately, the onset of type 2 diabetes can often be delayed or prevented.

Generally, men should start getting screened for diabetes by age 45, but those who have additional risk factors should be screened earlier.

4. Limit your alcohol intake

If you are going to drink, do so in moderation to reduce the risk of liver disease which is twice as common in men as it is in women. Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Guidelines recommend that men drink no more than 15 alcoholic drinks per week or 3 per day (for women the number is 12 per week or 2 per day).

5. Take care of your mental health

Men are just as susceptible to anxiety, depression, and other mental health issues as women, but men often find it more difficult to talk about them.  But speaking up about your mental health can literally save your life (men are three times more likely than women to die from suicide).

Take your mental health as seriously as you take your physical health and make it part of your next conversation with your doctor.

If you have an older male in your life that needs a little extra help to maintain their health and independence living at home, we can help.

Call us today for a free consultation.